Will A Waterbed Crash Through My Bedroom Floor?

So you’ve probably heard about waterbeds and how they can enhance your sleeping experience dramatically, however, many people still have doubts about whether or not they are  right for them. Many people fear the weight of a waterbed will crash through the bedroom floor it’s resting on. While this may be a fear of yours, in most instances it shouldn’t be. Perhaps one of the most widely asked questions’ concerning waterbeds is if their floors can handle the weight of a waterbed? This is a great question, especially if you live in an apartment building, new or old house, even a mobile home. Other options often include upstairs attics or a porch that has been converted into a bedroom.

If you are living in a house, apartment building, or mobile home, depending on where you live the structure should have to comply with local inspections to ensure that it meets the standards of various building codes. One of these codes is making sure that the floor is strong enough to handle its occupants and strain they will put on the floor. Did you know that waterbeds consume less weight per square foot than a refrigerator, washing machine, bookshelf, or fish tank? If you are able to have a these items in your home, more often than not you can have a waterbed without worrying about your floor caving in. Often you can get a feel for the floors sturdiness by walking through a room casually. If things on shelves rock and rattle violently because of a spongy floor definitely seek profession advise. More often than not attics and old converted porches do not have proper supporting floor joyces. Trailers /mobile homes with out proper peering or foundation may not support them as well.

757378504_11042cffe9There are light weight options to the traditional wood frame hard side waterbed. There are two additional different types of waterbeds that have been made to ensure less weight. These two types of waterbeds include Deep filled softside waterbeds and shallow filled soft side water mattresses. Both are still extremely comfortable, and they both weight between 40 percent and 70 percent less than traditional wood frame water bed. Since these waterbeds are so lightweight they allow individuals additional piece of mind that they can own one without fear.

Waterbeds are a great way to relax and enjoy a great night of sleep. However, many people are afraid that their floor is unable to withstand the weight. Yet, this concern of safety and protection is eliminated with the newer lightweight beds. Even though the old hardside waterbeds could weigh as much as two thousand pounds (2000lbs), a house that has been inspected and passed all modern building codes should be able to handle the load. This is because the waterbed weight is distributed over a broad area. Approximately 50lbs per square ft., thus exerting less weight per square foot than many items you currently have in your home now. However, if you are afraid that your floor may not hold the load, I would suggest seeking the advise of a building inspector, general contractor, or even your insurance agent to get additional advice. My opinion is this, if your house can’t handle the weight of a waterbed, then you should probably keep an eye out on your refrigerator and a few other house hold items, they may be just as likely to surprise the people living under you. Bottom line in, if in doubt you should seek assistance or advice from a professional who can determine the structures floor strength.

About 

Doug Belleville and his father Dave own and run STLBeds - a specialty sleep store located in Arnold, MO. The staff at STLBeds is highly educated about sleep, comfort and their special sleep products. STLBeds only carries high quality mattresses and bed-related products. You won't find the brand names here - just call and ask us why!

6 Comments Leave your comment »

approximately how much weight can an upstairs room hold?

Comment by James — January 21, 2008 @ 10:25 am

I cannot say for sure it would vary widely, that would be a question for an engineer, architect, maybe even your insurance agent. A simple test although not conclusive by any means is to check the second floor for vibrations. Maybe have a couple people walk through out the second floor while a third looks and listens from downstairs for shuddering ceiling fans and rattling light fixtures even easy to hear footsteps.

In new construction I would try to determine what load standard the builder is using or in preexisting structure what was used. This is not my line of expertise but these are terms you may want to Google; wood floor joist construction, concentrated and uniformly distributed live loads, uniform partition load. Waterbed I believe would be a dead load.
Thanks for the great question. I am sure it will help others.
Doug

Comment by Doug — January 21, 2008 @ 10:49 am

Actually, a waterbed would be live load, dead load is the weight of the floor itself before anyone is present./ Live load is anything the person living there brings in.

Comment by Brie — February 4, 2008 @ 8:02 am

A waterbed load is a mix of live and dead. The weight of the bed frame would be considered a dead load since it’s static, but the water itself could be considered dead when it’s still, or live when it’s sloshing around (slosh dynamics).

Comment by guido — January 25, 2014 @ 9:12 am

MY LANDLORD IS TOO SCARED TO LET ME FILL UP MY WATERBED. IS HE JUST BEING A LITTLE FEMALE DOG? I LIVE ON THE SECOND FLOOR AND HE SAYS THE APARTMENT UNDER ME HAS THEIR BEDROOM DIRECTLY UNDER MINE. THERE IS A WE BIT VIBRATION OF THE FURNITURE WHEN WALKING AROUND MY BED ROOM BUT THE VIBRATIONS IN THE KITCHEN ARE MORE EXTREME AND I HAVE A REFRIGERATOR AND STOVE IN THERE. THE FLOOR OF THE KITCHEN HASN’T CAVED IN YET. SHOULD I JUST FILL UP THIS KING SIZE OLD SCHOOL WOOD FRAME WATER BED AND HAVE A GOOD OL’ SLOSH FEST ON IT WITH MY WIFE AND SEE IF WE END UP IN THE APARTMENT BEDROOM DOWNSTAIRS ON TOP OF THOSE HEATHENS THAT LIVE THERE? ANSWER QUICKLY PLEASE BEFORE I KILL SOMEONE. LMAO!!!!!!!

Comment by YOJANN THE JEW — March 8, 2014 @ 1:46 pm

(Laughing) While we know the chances of it falling through are slim to none it’s his apartment and his rules. I guess that is why most of us left home to move out on our own. Doug

Comment by Douglas Belleville — March 11, 2014 @ 8:23 am

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